POLE SPORT

Resources and Documents

All documents can be found on our Documents page.

POSA Pole Sport Code of Points (2024)

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POSA Difficulty Sheet (.xlsx)

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How to Fill out a Difficulty Sheet

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POSA Rules & Regulations (2024)

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USPSF Rules & Regulations (2024)

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Divisions

Divisions are determined by the level of difficulty.  "Generally speaking," Amateur athletes do elements up to the 0.5 point range, whereas Competitive athletes perform up to the 1.0 point range, as shown in the Elements Table in the Code of Points.
Here are some video samples.

Competitive Division

Melvin Sanchez
Senior Men Competitive 

Pole Sport World Championship 2021
2nd Place

Amateur Division

Judit Kovács 
Masters 40+ Women Amateur

Pole Sport World Championship 2022
Winner

Parapole Division

Ophélie Lesire
Parapole - Impaired Muscle Power

Pole Sport World Championship 2022
Winner

Music

Amateur and Para-pole division routines are 3:20 to 3:30 minutes.
Competitive division length is 3:20 to 3:30 for Juniors and 3:50 to 4:00 for Seniors and Masters.

The first tone of the music marks the beginning of the routine, while the last tone marks the end.

Age Category

Age categories are defined by the competitive year rather than the birth date.

Varsity: 6-9 yr (born 2015-18)
Junior A: 10-14 yr (born 2010-14)
Junior B: 15-17 yr (born 2007-09)
Senior: 18+ yr (born before 2006)
Masters 40+ (born before 1984)
Masters 50+ (born before 1974)

Competition Stage

The height of the pole is ~13 ft (4m).  The diameter of the pole is 45 mm.  The distance between poles is 9.5 to 10 ft (3m).  The pole will be chrome or stainless steel.  The static pole is on the left side of the stage from the audience's perspective, and the spinning pole is on the right.  Changes in the material, diameter, and pole height will be published in the National Competition's Work Plan (when released).

The stage will be 26x26 to 32x32 with wood or linoleum flooring and may be elevated.   

How the Competition is Scored

Routines are scored on artistry, execution, and difficulty.

The judging panel includes nine to thirteen judges. They consist of one head judge, two difficulty judges, and three to five artistic and execution judges (each).

Difficulty Scoring

This score is based only on the elements declared on the Athlete's Difficulty Sheet.  The minimum requirements for each element are stated in the Elements Table of the Code of Points.

Groups

There are 5 groups of "type of elements".
Group A (Flexibility) - held stationary for 2 seconds
Group B (Strength) - held stationary for 2 seconds
Group C (Static spin) - one revolution without contact with the floor
Group D (Dynamic)
Group E (Spinning pole) - perform a Group A or B and held stationary for two rotations

The Athlete must declare at least one difficulty element from each group and complete it to the minimal requirements.

Level of Difficulty

The Level of Difficulty table in Section 9.7 of the Code of Points shows the acceptable range of difficulty based on your age category.

Amateur Division
Amateurs must declare five elements within the allowable range in their age category (i.e. one element from each group).  They may additionally declare one extra element valued above the allowed age category.

Competitive Division
Competitive athletes must declare ten difficulty elements.  Junior athletes may additionally declare one element valued above the allowed age category.

Bonuses

Combination Bonus
When an Athlete declares two difficulty elements from two different element groups and completes them to the minimum requirements while also providing a direct transition between the two elements, they will receive a 1 point bonus. Up to three combination bonuses may be awarded, and the athlete must declare them on their Difficulty Sheet.

Super Bonus
A Competitive Senior or Master 50+ Athlete may declare one additional combination bonus if those two elements are valued at 1.0 each and performed to the minimum requirements. For this additional difficulty, they get an additional 1 point (i.e. a total of 2 points). This can only be awarded once.

Risk Factor Bonus
These are awarded by the Difficulty Judges to Athletes who complete a difficulty element with a high level of risk while also satisfying the minimum requirements. Athletes do not declare these on their Difficulty Sheet.

Scoring

Each athlete performs the elements in the sequence specified on their Difficulty Sheet. The Athlete can still do moves not on the Difficulty Sheet, but the Difficulty Judge will not evaluate them.

- When the Athlete completes each declared difficulty element and meets all of the requirements, the element's value is added to the difficulty score.
- For Groups A, B, and E that refer to a "parallel line to floor", the move's value may be reduced by 0.2 or 0.4 points if done correctly but slightly above or below the parallel line.
- If the minimum requirements are not met, the element is valued at zero.
- Bonuses are awarded to scored elements.

Potential Deductions

- Elements not performed in order of appearance or not performed at all
- Missing a group
- Incorrectly filled Difficulty Sheet (e.g., incorrect declaration of combinations or amount of difficulty elements, elements outside the allowed range, sheet not supplied in Word or PDF format)

Execution Scoring

This score is based only on the technical execution of all the moves on the pole, transitions, and floor work.  For Doubles, this also includes timing and uniformity of movements.

What is Execution?

This is the ability to perform movements with flawless technique, maximum precision, proper posture, and body alignment.  This includes: 

The Knee and Toe Alignment
There is a straight line connecting the kneecap to the big toe. The foot and toes are pointed, and the toes are not clenched.

Clean Lines
Properly positioning the legs and arms, as well as pointing the feet and toes at full extension (the feet are not sickled). Maintaining tension-free fingers and toes, and only flexing the feet if performed as part of choreography.

Extension
Fully extending the legs, arms, back, neck, wrists, and chest. Avoiding rounded shoulders and back, and the head is held high. 

Posture
Maintaining proper posture while on and off the pole. There are no uncontrollable movements.

Execution in the Routine

Transitions
Transitioning from one move to another with fluidity and grace, without hesitation or re-balancing. Transitions should appear effortless.

Angles of Moves
Performing every part of the routine at the desired angles. When using a spinning pole, the athlete is keeping full control to avoid stopping at an unfavorable angle.

Using Poles Equally
Using both static and spinning poles equally and without favoring one over another.

Using More than 70% of the Pole 
When the athlete's hands or feet extend beyond 70% of both poles during their performance. 

No Slipping, Losing Balance, or Falls
No loss of control or balance, and minor slips or losses of balance do not interfere with the performance.

No Fidgeting
No drying of hands on the costume, torso, pole, or floor as well as fussing with hair or outfit.

Execution for Doubles

Uniformity and Synchronicity
Performing as a single unit with identical range of motion, timing, and quality. Choreography includes precise and continuous movements.

Using Poles Equally
Using both poles independently (one on each pole) and together (both on the same pole).

Scoring

Each athlete starts with 75 points for execution. Any deviation from "perfect execution" is deducted from the initial 75 points.  That then is the athlete's overall execution score.

Deductions for each Occurrence
-0.5 point for each poor execution
-1 point for each poor transition, bad angle of move, slip or loss of balance
-1 point [Doubles] for each lack of uniform movement
-2 points for each fidget
-5 points for each uncontrolled fall to the floor

One time deductions
-3 points for not using poles equally or using less than 70% of the pole
-5 points [Doubles] If the majority of the performance is not synchronized

Artistic Scoring

This score is based only on the presentation of the routine, including moves around the pole and stage area.  This includes the ability to perform dance and acrobatic choreography with emotion and expression as well as having stage presence.

Criteria

The routine needs to have originality in theme, music, costuming, and dance throughout to make it a unique and memorable routine. The routine should establish a character or persona and a story.

Originality
The routine has innovative choreography by combining unique moves and combinations.  This is for the entire routine, including movement on and off the pole and dance choreography throughout.

Clean Lines
Properly positioning the legs and arms, as well as pointing the feet and toes at full extension (the feet are not sickled). Maintaining tension-free fingers and toes, and only flexing the feet if performed as part of choreography.

Extension
Fully extending the legs, arms, back, neck, wrists, and chest. Avoiding rounded shoulders and back, and the head is held high. 

Posture
Maintaining proper posture while on and off the pole. There are no uncontrollable movements.

Execution in the Routine

Transitions
Transitioning from one move to another with fluidity and grace, without hesitation or re-balancing. Transitions should appear effortless.

Angles of Moves
Performing every part of the routine at the desired angles. When using a spinning pole, the athlete is keeping full control to avoid stopping at an unfavorable angle.

Using Poles Equally
Using both static and spinning poles equally and without favoring one over another.

Using More than 70% of the Pole 
When the athlete's hands or feet extend beyond 70% of both poles during their performance. 

No Slipping, Losing Balance, or Falls
No loss of control or balance, and minor slips or losses of balance do not interfere with the performance.

No Fidgeting
No drying of hands on the costume, torso, pole, or floor as well as fussing with hair or outfit.

Execution for Doubles

Uniformity and Synchronicity
Performing as a single unit with identical range of motion, timing, and quality. Choreography includes precise and continuous movements.

Using Poles Equally
Using both poles independently (one on each pole) and together (both on the same pole).

Scoring

Each athlete starts with 75 points for execution. Any deviation from "perfect execution" is deducted from the initial 75 points.  That then is the athlete's overall execution score.

Deductions for each Occurrence
-0.5 point for each poor execution
-1 point for each poor transition, bad angle of move, slip or loss of balance
-1 point [Doubles] for each lack of uniform movement
-2 points for each fidget
-5 points for each uncontrolled fall to the floor

One time deductions
-3 points for not using poles equally or using less than 70% of the pole
-5 points [Doubles] If the majority of the performance is not synchronized